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RICHMOND CYCLING CAMPAIGN: Climate Safe Streets

ClimateSafeStreets

We’re calling on Richmond Council to make an urgent commitment to deliver #ClimateSafeStreets.

Road transport emissions are the largest and most stubborn source of London’s emissions and borough councils control 95% of the city’s roads. We need a strong commitment from all our borough councils now – that’s why we’re calling on Richmond Council to play a full and fair part in cutting road transport emissions and ensuring London becomes a zero-carbon city by 2030.

Richmond and the Climate

Richmond has declared a climate emergency and has committed to becoming carbon neutral by 2030. Their Climate Change Strategy Report even states that they resolve to become “recognised as the Greenest London Borough.” Their Active Travel Strategy details their plans for the transport sector, including a headline target for 75% of trips to be by sustainable modes by 2041, expanding the cycle network, improving air quality, reducing road danger and increasing the use of public transport. These aims will be achieved through a new Local Implementation Plan which mirrors the Mayor’s Transport Strategy.

In light of Richmond Council’s current approach towards addressing the climate crisis, we’re requesting the following asks of the council’s next leader to ensure that their roads are decarbonised by 2030.

Richmond Cycling Campaign’s Asks

  1. A Strategic Cycle Network: safe, inclusive, accessible cycle routes between all areas of the borough and coherent connections to routes in adjacent boroughs
  2. Safe Active Travel Spaces: increase the number of safe, active neighbourhoods, parklets and LTNs across the borough linked with strategic cycleways to create a network of safe, comfortable, inclusive active travel routes
  3. Active Travel promotion and access programme: an ongoing programme to promote and support cycling for all age and ability groups through events, education, and incentives, and providing access to cycles for people to use, including supporting Disabled cycle users and non-standard cycles, and providing accessible, secure, affordable cycle storage
  4. Borough-wide shared mobility hubs/share scheme offering bookable e-cars, e- vans, e-bikes, e-cargo bikes, and e-scooters, to reduce the burden of car ownership on individuals and the local environment
  5. Freight consolidation centres, last miles distribution centres, cargo bike loan schemes and other measures to reduce the carbon footprint, vehicle miles and impact on the borough of deliveries, servicing and other freight vehicle movements by 10% by 2026.

Who’s on board?

The Liberal Democrats and Green Party in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames have both committed to supporting our Climate Safe Streets headline asks.  Cllr Alexander Ehmann provided this statement to qualify the Lib Dems’ commitment.

 

How do we get there?

We have compiled a list of detailed changes which we feel will have the greatest impact on our asks:

  1. A Strategic Cycle Network: safe, inclusive, accessible cycle routes between all areas of the borough and coherent connections to routes in adjacent boroughs, planned by 2024, and at least half implemented by 2026
    • Hammersmith Bridge to Barnes via A306 Castelnau
    • Twickenham to Richmond via Richmond Road
    • Richmond to Putney via A305 Sheen Road and the A205 South Circular
    • Kingston to Richmond via Ham
    • Hampton to Twickenham via Hampton Hill
    • Segregated Cycle Lanes – Kew Bridge
      • CW9 to Kew Road Cycle Lane
      • CW9 to A205 (Upper Richmond Road
      • A316
      • Cross Deep
      • Lonsdale Road
      • Connection Broom Rd to Kingston Bridge.
      • Car parking (eg along Sheen Rd) to be swapped over so bike lanes are between the pavement and the cars rather than between parked & moving cars (still need a buffer, passengers may be even less careful than drivers)
  2. Safe Active Travel Spaces: increase the number of safe, active neighbourhoods, parklets and LTNs across the borough linked with strategic cycleways to create a network of safe, comfortable, inclusive active travel routes, planned by 2024 and at least half implemented by 2026
    • All schools protected by School Streets by 2024 and by 2026 where alternative safe active travel measures are needed – such as removing kerbside parking, widening footways, and providing protected cycle lanes on main roads with schools on.
    • 25% (equivalent to 11th position this year) of the borough’s suitable roads are covered by LTNs by end of 2024.
    • A bus gate on Richmond bridge
    • Bridge cycle lane connections where missing: Twickenham Bridge, Teddington
    • Lock, Kew Bridge
    • 20mph enforcement
    • Richmond Park to go car free / no through traffic
    • 4 parklets by 2024 and 4 more per year
    • Pedestrianise 2 high streets by 2025
    • Repair broken footways to support an accessible walking environment (along with parklets, which offer resting points for Disabled people walking)
  3. Active Travel promotion and access programme: an ongoing programme to promote and support cycling for all age and ability groups through events, education, and incentives, and providing access to cycles for people to use, including supporting Disabled cycle users and non-standard cycles, and providing accessible, secure, affordable cycle storage
    • A subsidised system for low income families to use dockless bikes and scooters
    • Dockless bike hire system installed in any new developments over a certain number of units with free membership for eg 3- 4 yrs
    • Negotiate with Kew Gardens ( and other attractions – Ham House, Hampton Court etc) a concessionary entrance fee for visitors not coming by car
    • Reduce cost of bike hangars
    • A cycle hub at every station
    • Open Sheffield type stands on streets near houses, flats, schools and surgeries (dental & doctors)
    • Raise awareness of/improve access to and provision for non-standard cycles/Disabled cyclists
  4. Borough-wide shared mobility hubs/share scheme offering bookable e-cars, e- vans, e-bikes, e-cargo bikes, and e-scooters, to reduce the burden of car ownership on individuals and the local environment
    • 600m proximity aim for all borough – start with a pilot in a low-traffic neighbourhood, or in two adjacent LTN zones
    • Hubs to include e-car, e-van, e-bike, e-cargo bike, e-scooter (potentially)
    • This is to reduce the burden of car ownership on individuals and to free up valuable space assets – kerbside and parking spaces for carbon capture, walkable/sociable/playable space
    • We know that most cars spend 95% of their existence parked up
    • People who own cars are more likely to use them for the ‘I shouldn’t really drive for this but’ type of very short trip, which accounts for 1/3 of London’s driven journeys (sub 2 miles) than people who have to hire or sort out a share
    • Obviously that then impacts on (a) congestion and (b) safety in local streets for people walking and cycling
  5. Freight consolidation centres, last miles distribution centres, cargo bike loan schemes and other measures to reduce the carbon footprint, vehicle miles and impact on the borough of deliveries, servicing and other freight vehicle movements by 10% by 2026
    • Support local businesses in moving from van to e-bike (when Brighton & Hove council did this in 2020, demand far outstripped supply)
    • Work with larger delivery firms to find consolidation spaces and incentivise e- cargo for last mile (look at models of Pedal & Post, Oxford, and Zedify, London, Edinburgh, Cambridge, Brighton)
    • This will reduce the wear and tear on infrastructure, particularly kerbsides, reduce emissions across the borough, and improve safety, as e-cargo cycles do not cause the terrible sightline issues and damage to kerbs and footways that vans do.

 

 

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